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their eyes at our demise. nasa scientists tell people not to worry about the myan calendar. "red eye" hit the streets to see if the they are ready for the end of days as the stupid scientists aren't. naked party at my place on the 20th, everyone. >> it is the end of the world as we know it, and all of these people feel fine. let's find out why. >> you are aware of what is happening on december 21st, 2012, yes? >> the myan prediction that the world will end? >> well, i hate to use the word prediction. it is happening. >> i don't think you can predict the end of the world. i am not too much of a believer jie. what part of the myans always being right do you not understand? >> have you been hoarding your goods and bombshelter and lots of unpro -- unprotected sex? >> none of the above. >> i am starting to think you are not taking armageddon seriously enough. >> i like to live on the edge. i think i can handle it. >> here is why i think it can be an asteroid attack. have you seen "deep impact." >> no. >> we had a black president in that movie too. >> buying all kinds of stuff, and then i will
of this world. right now nasa is revealing the latest discovery on mars. ready in welcome to brand-new hour of "happening now," i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. uncovering new knowledge about the red planet. today's announcement comes nearly four months after the six-wheeled robot landed in a giant crater. nasa unveiling the latest findings today as a gathering of scientists around the world come together. claudia cowen joins us by phone. >> reporter: this would be a game change err but most likely not. this may be a little overhyped after one scientist said that the data would be one for the record books. that was tweeted by curiosity itself through a twitter account run by nasa's jet propulsion lab. for the past few weeks nasa has had to real in expectations issuing a press release saying today's news quote will be the update about the first use of the rove verse full array of analytical instruments to inspect a drift of sandy soil. some say they may have uncovered methane, and that aliens may have been decomposing. the rover is working to identify organic compounds to see if mars can
for lauren. bill: packing his bags in a moment. we'll hear from nasa astronaut scott kelly who is literally about to move into outer space for an entire year. how about that for a road trip? ♪ [singing] martha: the parents of missing college student lauren spiere are saying they are being stonewalled by the friends she was w the people who last saw their daughter. they say they simply are not talking about what happened that night. she vanished last year after a night of partying at her school, indiana university. indiana authorities say they are actively investigating the 20-year-old girl's disappearance but of course the parents want answers as to what happened to their daughter. i'm joined by keith sullivan, a defense attorney, and tamara holder, fox news legal analyst, welcome to both of you. tamara, mrs. spiere's letter is heart wrenching and you can understand why she is frustrated feeling that these people who were with her, because she went back and forth, she went to a bar, she went over to the friends' house and left there alone. one of the boys said he saw her walk across the g
sister te, the $8 million man, and nasa's high res look at you on our planet earth. "early today" starts right now. >> announcer: this is "early today" for thursday, december 6th, 2012. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. well, this week president obama put syrian leader bashar al assad on notice specifically about the use of chemical weapons, and now we know why. pentagon sources tell nbc news syria is preparing chemical weapons for their possible use against the syrian people in the form of aerial bombs. >> reporter: as the fighting grows more intense and syrian rebels close in on damascus, the syrian regime has turned increasingly desperate. u.s. officials tell nbc news the syrian military has now loaded the precursor chemicals for seron nerve gas into aerial bombs that could be dropped from dozens of syrian fighter bombers. this week u.s. intelligence detected a flurry of activity at chemical weapons site, like this one near homs. while u.s. officials confirmed the precursor chemicals are loaded and they must be mixed together to get the sarin gas. president obama and hillary
's giveaway. >> thank you. we're getting spectacular new pictures of nasa today of the planet earth. these nighttime views are called the black marble. they're made up of composite data. nasa says the satellite is so sensitive, it can detect light from just a single ship at sea. >> wow. >> that's pretty incredible. >> really incredible. and i can see why they call it marble. looks like extraordinary marble, doesn't it? >> looks like what my mother used to trip over all the time. >> straight ahead on wjz eyewitness news at 4:00. shocking scene. the ground collapses in turkey, injuring at least one person. >>> police rush in to arrest a suspect and his family blocks the way. >>> and we are back to normal mid-december temperatures. and it may warm up just in time for the weekend. bob is updating your first warning forecast. [ boy 1 ] hey! that's the last crescent. oh, did you want it? yea we'll split it. [ female announcer ] made fresh, so light buttery and flakey. that's half that's not half! guys, i have more! thanks mom [ female announcer ] pillsbury
. >> reporter: from a nasa camera it looked like a bright light above the earth. that's the view from space. these are from eyewitness viewers around houston just as day was breaking. a bright flash of light some people first thought was lightning. >> i guessed it was going to rain. >> reporter: it wasn't the weather. this map just a sampling of sightings in the houston area. and these are some of the pictures september to showing a small area of colored light, others showing a trail behind it. people have been talking about it all day. >> like a ufo taking a picture of the sky, like a big flash. >> a co-worker started talking about, did you hear about the flash this morning? i'm like, flash? should i be concerned? >> reporter: at the houston museum of natural science, not concern but a lot of curiosity. >> yeah, it was going so fast, it actually gets through the atmosphere, that makes the flow. >> reporter: the museum's astronomer suspects it's a meteorite, a small piece of rock burning through space. fit meets the criteria. >> did it make a trail? did it actually move? did it c
. debra wrigley of ktrk has the story. >> reporter: from a nasa camera, it looked like a bright light above the earth. these are from eyewitness viewers around the houston area. just as day was breaking a bright flash of light that some people thought was lightning. >> i was like i guess it's going to rain. >> reporter: it wasn't the weather and it was spotted all around texas. this map just a sampling of sightings in the houston area, and these are some of the pictures sent to abc showing a small area of colored light. others showing a trail behind it. and people have been talking about it all day. >> taking a picture of the sky like a big flash. >> co-workers who are talking about did you hear about the flash this morning? i'm like flash? should i be concerned. >> reporter: at the houston museum of natural science, not concern, but a lot of curiosity. >> it's going so fast it actually gets through the atmosphere. >> the museum's astronomer suspects it's a meteorite, a small piece of rock burning through space. if it meets the criteria. >> did it make a trail, did it actually
. morning showers in st. louis, 62 degrees. rain in seattle, 52 degrees. >>> nasa's voyager one has made a another startling discovery, a magnetic highway at the edge of the solar system. the probe was launched 35 years ago and is about 11 billion miles from earth. scientists say the magnetic highway is the last layer between the solar system and interstellar space and could take two to three years to cross. on mars, curiosity may have found signs of life. scientists said on monday the rover found hints of carbon, an essential building block for life. the problem, though, scientists aren't sure where they carbon came from. they say it could have been from the red planet or could have come from comets or asteroids or could have been brought by the rover itself. >>> the twitterverse has a new member. the pope. starting next wednesday, pope benedict will send his first tweet. it is a verified account, i did check earlier. he'll tweet in eight different languages. the english version already has plrn 3 -- more than 325,000 followers. the vatican says the pope doesn't plan to follow anyone on
. nasa turned to solar cells as a sourt of power for the satellites. at the time they cost literally hundreds of dollars per watt. nasa didn't care, right? >> it's nasa. >> over the last decades the cost of solar cells has come down and down and down. the efficiency, the conversion efficiency has continued to go up and up and up, right? now you've got solar cells that are produced for under a dollar a watt. just in the last few years they came down a factor of three thanks to the chinese that ramped up production and made 50% of it. >> put some numbers around. this the price of solar panels have come down 46% since the first quarter of 2010. >> that's crazy. >> it's incredible. >> i'm glad that you cued up the international discussion. there's a lot of exciting stuff happening internationally. it's important for americans to hear this can be done. it doesn't have to be this sort of after thought welfare case. it can be integrated into how a nation gets its power. more on that after this break. >>> in germany right now there's been a real revolutionary transformation of the grid there
40 years since that historic scene. the final nasa mission sending a man to walk on the moon. last person to do that. he is the commander of a apollo 17 and the last ever made on the moon's surface leaving a special legacy for america's space program. joining us live. captain eugene cernan and last man to walk on the moon. i can't tell you how excited i was to talk to you today. thank you for joining us. >> you are welcome heather. you might have guessed i had no requests for auditions. >> heather: did you plan ahead what you were going sing and what you were going to do? >> no, we didn't. we plan ahead all we're going to from a scientific, but everything else you heard from most of these missions, your reaction to the environment and reaction to things. even things that were said when we left the moon, they come to you because of what you are confronted with. >> heather: explain to us. take us all back there that moment when you first stepped foot on the to the moon surface. what did you see and what did it feel like? >> well, heather, my first step was mine. no matter what a lot
, en el rango de 60 grados. y antes de despedirme, comparto el video, la nasa dio a conocer la hermosa imagen de nuestro planeta, en zonas se ven luces de la ciudad. cuando es de noche, pues este mapa de la tierra fue compuesto por fotografÍas de varios satelitos, durante 22 dÍas de alta resoluciÓn y buena calidad, se aseguraron que el cielo estuviera despejado para que quedara nitido y disfrutar de ello. es todo, gracias por acompaÑarnos, energÍa positiva, nos vemos maÑana, continuamos con mÁs de "primer impacto." >>> gracias jackie. >>> una nube toxica sembrÓ el pÁnico en argentina, algunos residentes en buenos aires huyeron de sus casas, por el extraÑo olor y efectos del peligroso material que se dispersÓ luego de un incendio en un barco, hasta ahora autoridad no descifraron el quÍmico que estaba en el contenedor se estima que los efectos no son graves para la salud. >>> mientras algunos en washington celebraron la ley que le permite fumar marihuana, y abren puertas para el consumo de marihuama medicinal, en nueva jersey, un niÑo de 6 aÑos consume una forma liquida que
a firearm from parts currently available for 3d printing. >>> look at these stunning nasa image s taken by environmental satellite. they are collected in a new nasa e-book called earth as art. the e-book is free under the connect link on nasa's website. >> those colors. >> space and art lovers unite. >>> a story that will inspire you to do something good today. a group of total strangers come together, they lift a car off a mom and her baby that is in her arms after a horrific crash. the two officers who responded are with us this morning. >>> and our very own barbara starr brings us a sneak peek of "zero dark 30," the film about how the u.s. hunted down and killed osama bin laden. all of a sudden washington has as many movie critics as hollywood. >>> and rapper jay-z explains to someone on the subway who he is. it is absolutely adorable. it is headed your way, next. >>> eight tiny reindeer and one jittery giraffe? why one city chose this animal to introduce santa and why it freaked out in the process. they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough ti
threats: disease, warmer seas and more acidic seas. it might be worth reminding the deniers what nasa says, the national air and space administration, what nasa says about climate change. here's what they say about global temperature rising -- and i quote -- "all three major global surface temperature reconstructions show that earth has warmed since 1880. most of this warming has occurred since the 1970's with the 20 warmest years having occurred since 1981 rand with all ten of the warmest years occurring in the past 12 years. even though the 2000's witnessed a solar decline in 2007 to 2009, surface temperatures continue to increase. on ocean temperature and sea level rise, nasa said -- and i quote -- "the oceans have absorbed much of this increased heat with the top 2,300 feet showing warming of .302 degrees tparpb heat since 1969. global sea level rose about 6.7 inches in the last century. the rate of sea level rise in the last decade, however, is nearly double that of the last century. and on ocean acidification, since the beginning of the industrial revolution, the acidity of surface o
, attached it to a balloon, and flew it to an altitude of ten miles. >> piccard: it was considered by nasa as the first man in space. so, in those days, it was like going in another world. >> simon: was your grandfather, in fact, the first human being to see the curvature of the earth? >> piccard: yes. and that was really impressive for me as a kid, because i was reading in the history books all the stories about the earth being flat, being round or whatever. and my grandfather came back and said, "i saw the curvature of the earth with my eyes." so, once you live this as a kid, of course, you want to continue into that field of exploration. >> simon: and he did. in 1992, bertrand entered and won the first-ever transatlantic balloon race. seven years later, he entered a much more demanding race, flying around the world in a balloon non-stop in three weeks. >> breitling orbiter three... >> simon: bertrand landed in the egyptian desert just in time. he was almost out of fuel, had almost fallen from the sky like icarus. his balloon capsule is now on display at the air and space museum at the s
. kevin ford doesn't have to wait for nasa to release picture like that. he sees views from space every day. he is the commander of the international space station. just a warning before we start speaking, there's about an eight-second delay because we're transmitting a long way this morni morning. so is it morning or night up there, kevin? >> it's already afternoon on board the space station. and we've already done an almost what feels like to me a full day's work. i have a little bit more work after the interview right now. so right now we are in a night pass. we are in the northern hemisphere right now out over the pacific ocean. it's dark outside right now. we'll be in light in just a matter of about ten minutes. >> i was just going to ask you that. how can you tell the difference between night and day? because, you know, in my mind it's always dark up there. >> well, the -- space is dark but, of course, when we're on the sun side of the earth, we're in full lumination and have the reflection of the earth below us, beautiful blue earth and we're in daylight. only on the back side of
. scientists want to analyze how the human body reacts to long-term exposure in orbit. this is part of nasa's larger plan to one day send man to mars but the journey, get this, takes eight months one way. so they must understand how the body reacts to those conditions. researchers already know it can affect eyesight. >> we discovered that some crewmembers are having some pressure in their intracain ya'll pressure, pressure in the vain system in their brains and spinal cord especially. that was causing in some crewmembers a vision impact. >> reporter: training for this mission starts early next year with the official launch date in the spring of 2015. jenna. jenna: pretty remarkable. when you think about the story, you wonder why can't we do the fiscal cliff thing? >> reporter: right. jenna: if we can put somebody in space for a year. >> reporter: we need to ask our lawmakers, right. jenna: casey, incredible story. gregg: you can put the man on the moon but you can't --. all right. researchers may have found what could be the earliest known dinosaur to walk the earth. the mysterious fossil f
at night revealing a planet that is really never in the dark. nasa releasing these pictures that were taken not by me, but by a special satellite called sumy npp. we're about to show you the united states, you can see it coming into frame, and you can see how the lights illuminating from the ground look a lot like the stars and the constellations we see when we look up at night. and here's a bird's eye view of egypt's nile river lit up by boats. yes, those are lights from boats. the reason these images are possible is because of a new sensor that is onboard the camera which stands for the national polar orbiting partnership. it was launched last year. it gives scientists -- and us -- a brand new way to observe what our planet looks like once the sun goes down. what do you think of that, jon? jon: that's cool. and atlanta really stands out in the shot of the sort of, you know, eastern seaboard. i don't know, it's kind of interesting. i was surprised that atlanta is so big and bright. >> reporter: atlanta and, of course, the northeast. and you can see there that sort of corridor up in new yor
of the silly aster sows, we can go to the russians and nasa to dismantle their systems so we don't have to deploy. sure enough -- immediately we were proven wrong. the peace movement in europe initially endorsed the idea that the zero option is a great idea, but then the reality sunk in that we didn't have the very strong negotiating position. what our job was in the early 80s was to convince the europeans that the only way we could get an agreement was to go forward with the deployment plan and it was hard. and ross will talk in a few minutes that reagan's own attitude towards nuclear weapons and how that was manifested. but i honestly believe elusiveness to bomb germany 1983. reagan actually saw several hundred thousand germans vigorously fighting the german police and opposition to the deployment of those missiles that he really internalized sense of opposition, the sense of concern about nuclear weapons. that coupled by the way some of you were the made for television movie the day after born-again president reagan watched this tv show about a town in the midwest gets nuked in kansa
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)